Carnegie Museum of Natural History

For more information, contact:
Kathleen Bodenlos
Carnegie Museum of Natural History
412.622.3361 (office)
BodenlosK@carnegiemnh.org

February 23, 2016

   

Live from Antarctica! Eric Dorfman will host a live public video conference in Oakland with Dr. Matt Lamanna
in cooperation with Oakland Business Improvement District

Eric Dorfman, Director of Carnegie Museum of Natural History, will be in person to host a live video conference with Matt Lamanna, paleontologist and principal dinosaur researcher, currently in Antarctica on expedition.

Thursday, March 10, 2016, 6–7:00 p.m.

Forbes Digital Plaza in Oakland, 3815 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213  

Live from Antarctica! Eric Dorfman, Director of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, will be on location at Forbes Digital Plaza in Oakland to host a live public video conference with Matt Lamanna, paleontologist and principal dinosaur researcher currently on expedition in Antarctica.

This is a free community event to encourage the general public, students, and others to ask Dr. Lamanna questions about his discoveries and experiences as he hunts for dinosaur fossils with a team of experts in Antarctica. Dr. Lamanna, will be aboard the research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer and projected live to the 10' x 8' foot high-resolution screen in Forbes Digital Plaza. He will answer questions from the live audience about his discoveries and what it is like to be in Antarctica on expedition. There will be other fun surprises for the audience as well.

Dr. Lamanna has led several expeditions throughout his career. Now with new technology he is able to communicate via video conference and provide updates on his findings from the field. For additional information on this expedition, please visit antarcticdinos.org.

Recently Dr. Lamanna received international press coverage when he and an international team of experts, completed work describing a plant-eating dinosaur from Argentina that is one of the largest animals to ever roam the earth’s surface. It weighed 40,000 – 60 ,000 kg (44 – 66 tons) and was named Notocolossus gonzalezparejasi.

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Carnegie Museum of Natural History, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, is among the top six natural history museums in the country. It maintains, preserves, and interprets an extraordinary collection of 22 million objects and scientific specimens used to broaden understanding of evolution, conservation, and biodiversity. Carnegie Museum of Natural History generates new scientific knowledge, advances science literacy, and inspires visitors of all ages to become passionate about science, nature, and world cultures. More information is available by calling 412.622.3131 or by visiting the website, www.carnegiemnh.org.